Ello! This is my tumblr (noo really?) and I post really random stuff. Mostly the latest things that I get into, of course funny things, hetalia, homestuck, and anything in between that. 'What else?' you may ask. Well you just have to find out. (By the way ask as much as you like: it is greatly appreciated!)
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Haku & Chihiro 

(via shslbubblybreeder)

frostbackscat:

One of the best animated villains in the entire fucking universe.

(via foriamsincerity)

tenfootpolesociety:

shavingryansprivates:

why he lick me

THIS IS SUPER COOL THOUGH IF YOU UNDERSTAND HORSES. LIKE THAT NIPPING IS A GROOMING BEHAVIOR HORSE’S DO TO BOND AND TO MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE SOCIAL BONDS. SO THAT HORSE IS BASICALLY TREATING THE CAT AS PART OF THE HERD AND SUSTAINING THE FRIENDLY BOND.

IT IS SAYING, “this tiny horse is very tiny but we are friends. Look at my tiny friend.”

(via wreckyourprivilege)

deenzih:

calibraptor:

guy:

i think the lesson of this photoset is to check yo muthafuckin math calculations before u hand the test in bc sometimes u need to check shit twice before u realize whats up (x)

Holy shit a two headed reindeer

"two headed reindeer"

(via laughingstation)

yamesmooma:

envy4breakfast:

CollegeHumor: The 10 Lies You Tell Yourself Every All-Nighter

This is all me.

(via joeshmo)

5 Common Story Problems with Simple Fixes

fictionwritingtips:

Our stories are often plagued with these common story problems, but if we don’t know how to fix them, we’ll never improve our writing. It’s important that you remember you don’t need to scrap your novel if you keep having the same issues over and over again. Hopefully this list will help you pinpoint what’s going on and provide ways for you to improve your novel.

Problem: Unmotivated Characters

If you’re having trouble figuring out where your story should go next, the problem could be with unmotivated characters. Characters aren’t in your novel just so you can push them around every once in a while and make them do things. They need to develop over time and keep your story going in the right direction.

Solution:

Work on your character’s wants, goals, and motivations. You need to figure out what’s driving your character if you want them to do anything. Where do they want to end up? What’s standing in their way? What’s their plan? Who will help them? Think about everything your character will need to do to resolve your novel. Focus on what they want and what motivates their actions and your characters will stop being dull and lifeless.

Problem: Boring First Chapters

A boring first chapter is dangerous because you want to captivate your audience right away. You don’t want to lose readers just because of this, but sometimes it happens.  You should give enough information to keep your readers interested, while also keeping them intrigued enough to figure out what happens next.

Solution:

Putting emotion into your scenes from the beginning will not only help set the tone, but we’ll get an immediate understanding of your world. The best advice I can give is to construct a scene that helps us best understand your character. If they’re on the run, show us that they’re being chased. If they’re sad and lonely, construct a scene that lets us feel their isolation. You don’t necessarily need to open your book with action, but you do need to introduce the conflict. Think about what your character wants and go from there. Think of your first chapter as an introduction to an essay. You don’t go right into the points immediately, but you set us up for something good.

Problem: Plot Holes

Writers worry about forgetting to include important information in their novel that’s necessary to the plot. If you’re discovering that readers often point out plot holes in your story, maybe it’s time to reevaluate how you plan your novel.

Solution:

Pre-planning or prewriting your novel often solves any plot hole problems. If you take the time to write out important scenes so you don’t forget them, your story will become stronger. However, if you’re not someone who likes to do so much planning, you can tackle plot holes during the editing phase. Take notes when you’re editing so that you can catch these plot holes and figure out where you can add necessary information. A plot hole does not always mean your novel needs loads of reworking, but it is something you need to take the time to fill in.

Problem: Poor Pacing

Poor pacing can ruin a novel, but luckily it’s something you can tackle head on before you even start writing your story. Good pacing helps add tension to your novel and helps you make sure there’s enough rising and falling action to keep your story interesting.

Solution:

Planning out your novel ahead of time also helps solve pacing problems. You can create a timeline that helps you keep track and plan out when you want certain things to happen. Read up on story arcs and try to plan out your scenes accordingly. If you’re already done with your novel and you notice poor pacing, try rearranging scenes or spreading out the action.

Problem: Info-Dumping

A very common writing problem is info-dumping. This is when you tell your readers loads of information at a time without showing them anything important. Info-dumps usually occur in first chapters of novels, but they can happen anytime during the course of your story. Info- dumps can drag down your story and bore your readers.

Solution:

Cut out long paragraphs where you explain what’s going on in your novel and show your readers instead. Avoid over explaining things that can be explained through action. Letting your audience figure things out instead is a much more satisfying reading experience and it lets your readers connect with your characters on a deeper level.

-Kris Noel

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

Learning the Essentials of Plotting Your Novel

fictionwritingtips:

I get a lot of questions about plotting, so I figured I’d write up some tips on getting started. Learning how to plot your novel can be difficult, but it’s really all about knowing what your characters want and how they’re going to get it or attempt to get it. A character with motivations and goals will help focus your plot and get you to figure out where it needs to go. Here are a few essentials when it comes to plotting your novel:

Create a plot skeleton

It helps to first jot down the key elements of the story you want to tell. Creating a plot skeleton means getting down to the bare bones of your story. What’s most important? What scenes are essential to your story? Once you figure out those key scenes and have some semblance of a beginning, middle, and an end, you’ll see your story start to come together.

Work on a timeline

If you’re having trouble figuring out when you want things to happen, try working on a timeline. What event needs to happen first in order to lead into the next big event? Your story is going to have some ups and downs, so you need to make sure your story is paced well. You don’t want action, action, action without any rest for your readers. Learning to pace your novel well is an important skill to have as a writer. I suggest reading up on story arcs.

Focus on characters

Your characters will tell the story if you let them. Focusing on the wants and needs of all your characters will help build the plot for you. It’s sometimes as easy as that. Think about what your character wants and go from there. What journey will your character be in for? What does the antagonist want? How do they stand in the way of your protagonist? Think about how one action leads to the next.

Make sure your scenes connect

When telling a story you don’t want to keep saying “and then this happens”. Then you’re just stringing together events without thinking about how they build on each either. You need to think about the “but” in your story. Something like this helps; “Amy wanted to go the school dance, but her mother doesn’t want her to go.” This explains that Amy really wants to do something, but another person is standing in her way. You can begin to think about conflict and why Amy’s mother doesn’t want her to go. You can begin to piece together a story and connect the dots.

Flesh out your story

Once you have all the big scenes figured out, you can begin to add extra detail and flesh out your novel.  Spend more time thinking about your world and the specific details of your characters. Work on scenes that will help reveal the setting and all those character details. Figure out what interactions are necessary to give your readers important information. Each scene should work to push the story to its resolution.

Let your characters resolve their problems

It’s very important that you let your characters resolve their problems on their own. If you’re developing your characters along the way, the resolution should be a result of them finally gaining the power, knowledge, strength, etc., to fix things. I know not every story will be “resolved”, but if you want your protagonist to grow in some way they need to figure out their own problems instead of relying on other factors to get them through. A good plot shows how your characters learned to overcome their obstacles on their own.

-Kris Noel

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

(via tthorinsbutt)

The sassy boy who lived.

(via feedurin)

lookingfor-thefaultinour-towns:

pizza-dome:

theevermysteriousowl:

LOSING MY SHIT

im gunNA VOMIT

"Of course you have left overs that looks fucking gross" I LOST IT THERE

(via horaquan)

floridasunshineee:

the best line ever

(via thefuuuucomics)

pokemoncap:

fxckbeans:

pokemoncap:

demontadark:

not-pizza:

pokemoncap:

RIP lil Tommy

HE DIDN’T DIE

RIP little Tommy

RIP lil Tommy

HE DIDNT DIE HE WAS RAISED BY KANGASKHAN

R I P    L I L    T O M M Y

(via ruinedchildhood)

Missed the Eclipse?

rocketsandorscience:

Don’t worry! Here’s a list of all the total lunar eclipses coming in the next 20 years!

  • Oct. 8, 2014
  • Apr. 4, 2015
  • Sep. 25, 2015
  • Jan. 31, 2018
  • Jul. 27, 2018
  • Jan. 21, 2019
  • May 26, 2021
  • May 16, 2022
  • Nov. 8, 2022
  • Mar. 14, 2025
  • Sep. 7, 2025
  • Mar. 3, 2026
  • Dec. 31, 2028
  • Jun. 26, 2029
  • Dec. 20, 2029
  • Apr. 25, 2032
  • Oct. 18, 2032
  • Apr. 14, 2033
  • Oct. 8, 2033

(via redeyeswhiteshota)

(via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

chloe-valens:

your favorite video game series is getting a new game

image

but it’s not coming out for a console you own

image

(via sirpimpmasterarthur)

© HEARTENS